Victoria Half Sovereigns

Queen Victoria reign lasted 63 years, the longest serving British monarch
before or since and the longest ever serving female monarch in history. Victoria
was born 24 May 1819 and began her reign on 20 June 1837 aged just 18. During
her long reign three different portraits appeared on the sovereign coins. These
have become known as the young head, the jubilee head and finally the old head.

Victoria Gold Sovereigns Young Head (1837-1887)

The first Half Victoria Sovereigns known as the young head were produced
when she first took to the throne in 1837. There are in fact two versions of the
young head sovereigns. The first was minted between 1838-1887 and is commonly
known as a shield due to the crowned shield on the reverse.

The second Victoria young head was minted between 1871-1887 when the shield
was replaced with St. George and the Dragon. Also the date was now moved from
the front of the coin to the reverse side. there were also some other small
changes including a mint mark added just below the neck.

Wear can commonly be found to the higher areas of these Sovereigns including
the lettering, Victoria’s head, the shield or St. George also have a tendency to
show signs of wear. You will also probably find dents and scratches common to
circulated coins of this age.

No young head half sovereigns were minted in 1840 and 1868. 1854 half
sovereigns are extremly rare.

Victoria Gold Sovereigns Jubilee Head (1887-1893)

To celebrate Victoria’s 50th Jubilee year an updated new portrait was
commissioned to illustrate a better likeness to the queen. The portrait
was done by Sir Joseph Edgar Boehm and received a lot of criticism as it
appeared to make the queen look bad tempered or angry. Victoria is
wearing a small crown and veil and the initials J.E.B. can be found at
the bottom of the head. The Half Jubilee Sovereign was produced for
six years and only ever had the St. George reverse. However the design
of the St. George was changed in 1891 giving the horse a slightly longer
tail and a ribbon behind St. Georges head.
 
Jubilee half sovereigns were not minted in 1888.
 
Victoria Gold Sovereigns Old Head (1893- 1901)

The portrait for the Victoria old head half sovereign was that of Sir
Thomas Brock and was minted from 1893. This design showed a more mature Victoria
wearing a crown and veil with the ribbon and star of the Garter. This Sovereign
was produced for nine years and again only ever had the St. George reverse. The
wording was changed to include IND:IMP, Victoria’s new title of Empress of
India.The Victoria Half Gold Sovereigns listed at our site are
constantly being updated with the latest coins for sale directly from the
leading auction website ebay. Buying coins at auction will give you a good idea
of how the market is moving and what price gold coins are trading at in the
private sector. You will also be able to see what sort of mark-up dealers
are adding to the coins they are selling. Gold coins will almost always
hold their value and so as a short or long term investment and against inflation
there is no better bet.